Using Wyeast 1275

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Using Wyeast 1275

Postby TCochran » Wed Feb 25, 2015 10:47 pm

My intention is to brew an ESB but the only British yeast available was Wyeast 1275, Thames Valley ale. I Have not brewed with it and looking to see if this will bear decent results. From the description it looks like it fits the style. Anyone have feed back on this strain?
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Re: Using Wyeast 1275

Postby seymour » Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:37 am

It's good.

Definitely a distinctly English estery kinda yeast, the historic Henley of Thames brewery strain, still widely used by classic English breweries such as Brakspear, Hepworth, Lovibond, and Wychwood (and possibly other Marston's owned) breweries. It's not considered the best strain for bottling, since it doesn't pack down very tight, but that hasn't kept Brakspear Oxford Gold from being a best-selling bottled ale. Perfectly fine for kegged or cask-conditioned brews. Same as White Labs WLP023. The revered Florida brewer Cigar City is rumoured to use Wyeast 1275.

If you've ever tasted any English ales with this shape pint bottle, it came through Hepworth and was made with this yeast. I see them at Cost Plus World Market and other stores a lot around the holidays.
http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/ridgeway-bad-elf-45/95256/
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On the other hand...I might take heat for recommending dry yeasts, but in all seriousness, Nottingham is excellent for relatively clean and high-attenuated English ale, and is perfect for bottling. Windsor is excellent for the other end of the English ale spectrum: lower-attenuated, full-bodied, fruitier with more residual caramel sweetness. Not just for when you're in a pinch anymore. And as you'd expect, they get better and better when you continuously repitch from the yeast cake...
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Re: Using Wyeast 1275

Postby siwelwerd » Thu Feb 26, 2015 8:48 pm

seymour wrote:On the other hand...I might take heat for recommending dry yeasts, but in all seriousness, Nottingham is excellent for relatively clean and high-attenuated English ale, and is perfect for bottling. Windsor is excellent for the other end of the English ale spectrum: lower-attenuated, full-bodied, fruitier with more residual caramel sweetness.


Not that either of us is answering your actual question Tim, but Seymour has some good points. Dry yeasts have come a long way in recent years. There's a number of new brands available, and while I haven't had a chance to try that many of them, I've had good results with various American and English strains (I gave up on German/Belgian strains). I'll add Safale's US-04 to your list of serviceable English strains; I've used it in bitters and brown ales with excellent results. I believe it is the Whitbread strain (like Wyeast 1099), but don't hold me to that. I use it anywhere I would have used the 002/1968 Fuller's strain; it's not the same ester profile, but I get similar attenuation.
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Re: Using Wyeast 1275

Postby TCochran » Fri Feb 27, 2015 7:31 am

So many homebrewers automatically think we have to use liquid yeast, we forget about dry yeast. Thank you for the very informative replies.
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Re: Using Wyeast 1275

Postby serizawa1234 » Thu Oct 13, 2016 11:42 pm

I get similar :)
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