Hallertau hops from A-B event

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Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby alanwells » Wed May 21, 2014 4:08 pm

Now that I have tons of Hallertau hops from the recent A-B event, I want to use them in a batch a beer but I have no idea how to gauge their strength or AA content. I remember some members saying they have given these hops out in years past so I was wondering if anyone could share their wisdom of how they have used their Hallertau hops and how their batch turned out. I'm guessing the AA content is on the lower side since the hops are on the older side.
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Re: Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby stlmalt » Wed May 21, 2014 7:06 pm

Here is hop info from the December Great Hop Give-Away.

http://stlbrews.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=4634

Hop variety- US Hallertau
% Alpha Acid- 6 - 7 % per sources at the A-B Hop Farm
Aroma- Very mild, slightly flowery and spicy
Typical Beer Styles- Lager, Pilsner, Bock, Wheat, Munich Helles
General Trade Perception- Traditional German aroma hop

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Re: Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby alanwells » Thu May 22, 2014 11:15 am

Thanks for sharing this Kent, exactly what I was looking for.
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Re: Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby seymour » Wed May 28, 2014 12:47 pm

Hello again, Alan.

If you're interested in some surprising historical recipes, check this out.

You know how India Pale Ales were invented in the late 1800s while England occupied India, in order to provide English military officers stationed there a taste of home? Well, something a lot of people don't realize is that Scotland was a major center of IPA brewing, too. That's right, highly-hopped Scotch Ale! The BJCP nonsense about Scottish brewers using very few hops contradicts historical brewing records. It's true hops don't grow well in Scotland, but that didn't mean brewers went without. Here's proof they imported them from North America and Germany. The following recipes come from actual brewer's logbooks, thanks to historian Ron Pattinson.

1885 Ushers IP (short for India Pale)
Brewery: Ushers/Thomas Usher & Son Ltd (historic, 1817-1981)
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
OG: 1046
IBU: 44
Grainbill: 99.2% Pale, .8% Black Malt (micronized and added to boil*)
Bittering hops: US Cluster (90 min)
Aroma hops: Hallertau (20 min), Hallertau (dry hops added to finished beer)
Colour: amber
Yeast: a relatively low-attenuating Scottish ale strain, brewery records indicate they simply borrowed yeast from various nearby breweries. The McEwans strain (available as Wyeast 1728 and White Labs WLP028) would be an inappropriate, something like Windsor or the Fullers strain would be better.

1885 Ushers P (short for Pale Ale)
Brewery: Ushers/Thomas Usher & Son Ltd (historic, 1817-1981)
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
OG: 1054
IBU: 67
Grainbill: 91.8% Pale, 8% Brown Malt, .2% Black Malt*
Bittering Hops: US Cluster (90 min)
Aroma Hops: Hallertau (20 min), Hallertau (dry hops added to finished beer)
Colour: deep amber
Yeast: a relatively low-attenuating Scottish ale strain, brewery records indicate they simply borrowed yeast from various nearby breweries. The McEwans strain (available as Wyeast 1728 and White Labs WLP028) would be an inappropriate, something like Windsor or the Fullers strain would be better.

*This is another interesting tid-bit: Scottish brewers often achieved darker colour and enhanced mouthfeel by adding the fine-ground black malt directly to the boil kettle, instead of mashed with the base malt.

Isn't it interesting how the local "Pale Ale" is maltier, hoppier, and more alcoholic than the export "India Pale Ale"? This might prove their local Scotsmen enjoyed IPAs fresh as much as we do nowadays, and the high-hopping wasn't purely a pragmatic long-range shipping thing as the story always goes...

Something like this might be a perfect use for your AB/InBev Hallertau trove.

Happy brewing!
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Re: Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby alanwells » Tue Jun 03, 2014 11:56 am

Thanks so much for the detailed response Seymour. I think this the perfect way to start off using my Hallertau hops. I already love how malty the scotch ale style is and with more hops I am sure that I would enjoy it even more.

If you ever are in need of any Hallertau hops feel free to shoot me a PM and I would be glad to spare a bag or two.
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Re: Hallertau hops from A-B event

Postby seymour » Tue Jun 03, 2014 12:33 pm

alanwells wrote:Thanks so much for the detailed response Seymour. I think this the perfect way to start off using my Hallertau hops. I already love how malty the scotch ale style is and with more hops I am sure that I would enjoy it even more.

If you ever are in need of any Hallertau hops feel free to shoot me a PM and I would be glad to spare a bag or two.

Cool, I might just take you up on that.

I could take some guff about this, but I think you could cheat some Hallertau hops into just about any style. I can't remember who was quoted in Hieronymous' For The Love Of Hops book (maybe the head-brewer of Victory?), but when asked about noble hops he answered something like "those are just good all-around beer-flavoured hops, they'll produce beer that smells and tastes like people expect beer to."

I agree. Historical brewing records never specified hops cultivars. At best, they might list where they were grown and maybe their freshness (or lack thereof.) Generally speaking, they demanded hops with fine traits, the finest they could afford. Hallertau (along with various German alternative names) were considered among the very finest, in many far-flung brewing centers.

I brewed a delicous Imperial IPA with mainly A/B Saaz hops, and Mike Conlon-Zimmermann brewed several delicious beers using his A/B Hallertau including a particularly tasty English Mild. The bottom line is, it would normally be prohibitively expensive to experiment with so many fine hops, so go crazy and have fun!
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