Kolsh Recipe

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Kolsh Recipe

Postby andyK » Sun Apr 19, 2009 3:47 pm

I am trying my hand at a Honey Kolsh. Recipe from the latest issue of BYO...5 gallons allgrain

9.25# Pilsner
.5# Vienna
1.25oz Hallertau (4%AA) 60 min
Kolsh Yeast

Seems simple enough but I want to add honey...maybe 1#

When should it be added, boil, seconday, kegging? I want to retain some honey flavor without it all fermenting out.
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Postby karst » Sun Apr 19, 2009 4:14 pm

Secondary would preserve most honey character (fermented cool) with out creating a bottle bombs from adding a pound at bottling unless you kill yeast and force carbonate. You could also use honey as primer for carbonation. 6 to 8 oz of honey malt will give you a generic honey character. My concern about adding honey would be that your Kolsch would dryout and be a bit overattenuated with the 1 lb "sugar" addition. Perhaps a bit less of a varietal honey with more honey flavor expression such as Orange blossom or apple blossom would be called for here.
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Honey

Postby Bob Brews » Sun Apr 19, 2009 4:18 pm

The problem with adding honey to a beer such as this is that the honey will almost always ferment out leaving very little flavor. Honey is a great fermentable to add to beers for the following reasons:
- it does not give those cider type off flavors which come from pure sugar
- it will add alcohol while keeping the beer on the light side (this can also be accomplished with rice syrup / or rice syrup
- it can add a slight honey flavor, but this depends significantly on the variety of honey used (be careful not to use a honey that could conflict)

A way I have see to add that honey flavor is to use something called "honey malt" which is made by Gambrinas. I have seen this on line and I think that Kent Robertson may be able to get his hands on some depending on where he is ordering the next batch of grain from. This grain adds a nice honey flavor.

If you already have the honey and want to go ahead with what you have planned, I think that the best time would be either in the secondary or to prime with at kegging. The vigorous fermentation of the primary will tend to scrub out a lot of that honey aroma, and also during the secondary, you should have enough alcohol and yeast to keep any wild organisms at bay and still convert the sugars.

Good luck
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Re: Honey

Postby siwelwerd » Sun Apr 19, 2009 5:08 pm

Bob Brews wrote:A way I have see to add that honey flavor is to use something called "honey malt" which is made by Gambrinas. I have seen this on line and I think that Kent Robertson may be able to get his hands on some depending on where he is ordering the next batch of grain from. This grain adds a nice honey flavor.


I've picked this up at St. Louis Wine & Beer in the past as well.
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Postby andyK » Sun Apr 19, 2009 8:22 pm

Anyone know how much this honey malt will contribute to flavor, gravity, Etc. How much is enough? Too much?

How should I adjust the Vienna malt?
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Postby MIKEW » Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:33 am

I would just replace the vienna with the honey malt.
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